americanguide

americanguide:

THREE TO SHOW / PALM BEACH KENNEL CLUB - WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

Owners, trainers, touts and hangers-on fill hotels and rooming houses, and throng the sunny streets, their patter concerned with odds, entries, and past performances. Paddocks and stands swarm with eager humanity each afternoon and evening. The playboy and plowboy, the dowager in pearls and the sylph in shorts, the banker on vacation and the grifter on prowl keep turnstiles clicking and feed staggering sums to the pari-mutuels. More than $34,000,000 was wagered at the horse tracks during the 1938-39 season, and nearly $10,000,000 at the dog tracks. … Gambling is both legal and illegal, for while it is quite within the law to buck pari-mutuels at the tracks, the same business with bookies is strictly illicit. 

Florida, A Guide To the Southernmost State (WPA, 1939)

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Brian McSwain was born and raised in New Orleans, but currently resides in South Florida. Lately he’s been driving out to photograph the Florida Heartland where the skies are incredible and there’s not much to get in the way of the sun. Find him on Tumblr at brianmcswainphotographs.tumblr.com, follow him on Instagram and see his work on Flickr.

fyodors
laclefdescoeurs:

Student Nihilist, 1883, Ilya Repin
“The Nihilist, that strange martyr who has no faith, who goes to the stake without enthusiasm, and dies for what he does not believe in, is a purely literary product. He was invented by Turgenev, and completed by Dostoevsky. Robespierre came out of the pages of Rousseau as surely as the People’s Palace rose out of the debris of a novel. Literature always anticipates life. It does not copy it, but moulds it to its purpose. The nineteenth century, as we know it, is largely an invention of Balzac. Our Luciens de Rubempré, our Rastignacs, and De Marsays made their first appearance on the stage of the Comédie Humaine. We are merely carrying out, with footnotes and unnecessary additions, the whim or fancy or creative vision of a great novelist.” — Oscar Wilde in The Decay of Lying

laclefdescoeurs:

Student Nihilist, 1883, Ilya Repin

The Nihilist, that strange martyr who has no faith, who goes to the stake without enthusiasm, and dies for what he does not believe in, is a purely literary product. He was invented by Turgenev, and completed by Dostoevsky. Robespierre came out of the pages of Rousseau as surely as the People’s Palace rose out of the debris of a novel. Literature always anticipates life. It does not copy it, but moulds it to its purpose. The nineteenth century, as we know it, is largely an invention of Balzac. Our Luciens de Rubempré, our Rastignacs, and De Marsays made their first appearance on the stage of the Comédie Humaine. We are merely carrying out, with footnotes and unnecessary additions, the whim or fancy or creative vision of a great novelist.” — Oscar Wilde in The Decay of Lying